Wondering about my allotment garden?

It’s growing! Actually, I need to make another trip down there, either today (late afternoon) or tomorrow morning.

Things are happening.

Here is the section that contains kale, curly endive, lettuce, eggplants, and two types of basil. So far, the weather’s been cool-ish, which has favoured the lettuce types. I expect that the warmer weather crops will gain the upper hand in the near future.

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I’ve also got about seven Yukon Gold potato plants happening! Happy happy, joy joy. This is my first time growing potatoes. Dad told me on the phone this morning that when the plant starts flowering, you can (very carefully, fingers only) start harvesting some new potatoes. So I’ll have to watch for flowers.

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Garlic scapes. Oh, how I love them. I love their shapes, too. They must have been the inspiration for all those splendid circular curves in Art Nouveau.

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I snipped them, and brought them home.Still have them in the fridge. Will probably use some in sautées, turn others into pesto (need to buy pesto ingredients ASAP).:

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This is one of my tomatoes:

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This is another of my tomatoes:

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I could have told you what/which they are if I had taken notes. Next time. I think they’re both from the smaller varieties: rainbow and ox heart.

My peppers are beginning to flower. These are all cherry bombs. I simply love them stuffed with feta cheese, preserved in olive oil, and want to try doing that myself.

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Walking onions create long flower stems, and the flowers break out; if they get fertilized, little bulbils form at the top of the stem, and they get larger and larger, until they’re so heavy that the flower stem falls over, somewhere between 6 and 18 inches away from the mother plant. These new little onion plants start the cycle all over again.

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Lupins. I have volunteer lupins. Purple, Pink, Salmon. Am waiting for the pods to turn black (which means they’re ripe) because I’ve got friends who want lupins.

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Cucumber. I love the little curled tendril.

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This is a pea flower. Not a sweet pea (which, I learned, are not edible flowers!) This is a flower of either a snow pea or a sugar snap pea (the label on the plant was ambiguous). I should be getting some peas, and then I’ll know if I’ve got sugar snap peas or snow peas.

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Some flowers, volunteers from a previous owner. Clearly a member of the Centurea family, but I don’t know which one. Bachelor’s Buttons are edible.

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Spearmint. I didn’t plant it. Mint needs to be seriously restrained in a garden. This is a nice picture of a garden thug.

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I’ll take more pictures my next visit! I’m definitely in lettuce & kale eating mode.

This entry was posted in Allotment garden, City life, Food, grown, Gardening, Urban nature by pat. Bookmark the permalink.

About pat

Visual thinker, first got interested in digital imagery in the early days of Omni magazine, back when it used to review what had happened at SIGGraph. I worked in the 3D software field for 23 years. Lifelong enjoyment of gardening grew over time; I was a Master Gardener (briefly) and had a vegetable and herb allotment garden in Toronto to grow vegetables, as well as perennial gardens at home. Gardening and enjoying fresh produce also raised my interest in cooking with really good local food. As more restaurants in Toronto are offering local fare, I enjoy dining out and sampling the visions the different chefs have.

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