It was that time of year again!

January 20th — it was the 11th anniversary of the day I quit smoking, and the 10th anniversary of when Lyne quit — this year’s about the 25th for Betty, and Sandy stopped smoking a long time ago.

So once again, we were off to Rodney’s to celebrate our taste buds and brimming wallets (hah. Well, at least we’re not paying $10 a pack for cigarettes). But before we went, I happened upon a link that Rodney’s posted from their twitter accountThe 7 Things You Need to Know About Oysters. So we went, armed with new information, to Rodney’s on Jan 19th.

 Careful reading of the menu showed us a range of east and west coast oysters, plus other must-haves!

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One thing we all love, and that Rodney’s tends to run out of (because other people love them too, fancy that) is smelt. They were on our first order, along with 3 types of oysters, and some tuna tartare.

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Jewel-like tuna tartare served with arugula salad.

 

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French-fry sized smelt: eat the whole thing!

We ate some other cooked foods, too — I think we each had a bowl of soup, but different ones. Lobster bisque, oyster bisque, the night’s special, and I had some traditional clam chowder (with a bunch of oyster crackers! Oooh, I have not had those in a loooong time):

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Clam chowder with lots of oyster crackers on top

We also commandeered 2 orders of deep-fried oysters (that’s one for each of us). It’s really amazing the difference in flavour between a raw oyster and a cooked one. The flavours leave the ocean-side, and become richer and creamier.

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Deep fried oyster beauty

And then there were all the raw oysters. I think we had 3 or 4 platters. I have pictures of all of them, but I’m not thrilled with the focus (I think I need to work on that). So here are some pictures — one platter picture, and a number of single oysters.

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Three types of oyster, and one for each of us. The heavily ruffled shells in the front are Beach Angels from the west coast. The other two types may have been Mystics and Cotuits, Atlantic oysters. In the back, behind the oysters, you can see the lobster bisque.

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This is how I eat my oysters. Just a pinch of horseradish.

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Naked oyster.

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Beach Angel shells — ah, empty. It’s the end of the night.

Thanks again, Rodney’s — and we’d like to thank our server, who was awesome and timely.

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About pat

Visual thinker, first got interested in digital imagery in the early days of Omni magazine, back when it used to review what had happened at SIGGraph. I worked in the 3D software field for 23 years. Lifelong enjoyment of gardening grew over time; I was a Master Gardener (briefly) and had a vegetable and herb allotment garden in Toronto to grow vegetables, as well as perennial gardens at home. Gardening and enjoying fresh produce also raised my interest in cooking with really good local food. As more restaurants in Toronto are offering local fare, I enjoy dining out and sampling the visions the different chefs have.

2 thoughts on “It was that time of year again!

  1. Well, what can we say, but Brilliant.
    Thank You for exercising your moment at The House of Shells.
    It was nice to see you caught the jest of why we have opened the door for over 26 years.
    The 68 employees will be made aware of your interest and report.
    I admire the reward process for not smoking!
    The Hot Oyster(pan fried) is a large North Western Pacific Beach Oyster and that Oyster pushes one, off the wharf, so to speak, when it comes to flavor. It is also the preferred Oyster to pan cook as it holds up under heat, not loosing it’s volume.
    Rodney’s shucks the meat fresh to fry.
    Again, congrats on loosing the tabbacco and thanks for the Oyster’n.
    Rodney

  2. Rodney, it’s the awesomeness and freshness of your shells and the courteous, friendly attentiveness of your servers, combined with the clean shucking of your boys at the bar, that brings us back year after year 🙂 Thank *you* for the oysters! (and we keep trying to talk your staff into quitting smoking!)!

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